Top five historic racers sold at Autosport International 2019

There was plenty of classic racers on offer at Silverstone Auctions' first ever Autosport International sale. We've picked out five of the best to cross the block

In association with

title

Top five historic racers at the Autosport International car auction

Autosport International, Europe's largest motorsport show, is unsurprisingly home to a rich selection of classic racing cars, some of which were sold at auction yesterday. From rough and tumble rally machines that have taken on gruelling endurance tests to poised machines for the racetrack, Silverstone Auctions' sale at Autosport International featured a bit of everything.

There was plenty to choose from, with prestigious racing machinery worth six figures featuring – but these five caught our eye most of all.

title

1966 Ford Cortina Lotus

It's hard to say what's more special about this lot – the machine itself, or the roll-call of racing legends that have sat in the driving seat.

This '66 Group 5 spec Ford Cortina Lotus was one of three built by the factory Lotus team for that year's British Saloon Car Championship. Rather than shy away from deploying its top Formula 1 drivers across other series, as is the norm today, Colin Chapman's team drafted in two-time F1 champion Jim Clark, one-time champ Graham Hill and fellow F1 drivers Peter Arundell and Jacky Ickx to pilot this very car.

It was expected to be one of the most expensive cars to sell this weekend, with an estimate of £180,000 – £200,000 ($230,000 - $260,000). Surprisingly it feel a little short of that quoted figure, eventually hammering at £150,000 ($193,000).

title

1985 MG Metro 6R4

Moving from the Cortina, a car steeped in racing history, to one without any to speak of, is this very lightly used Group B specification MG Metro 6R4. Most of these tackled either rally stages or rallycross tracks around the world in its mid-to-late '80s heyday but this one was spared active competition - instead previously owned by F1 team Williams and displayed at its headquarters.

That garage queen life means it has done only done 175 miles since new, still in a plain white livery that shows it's never had a true chance to drive in anger. We just hope whomever spent £150,000 on it will unleash it and have some fun.

title

1980 Ford Capri 'Fabergé'

Some historic touring cars are so rare that the only way to see them racing in modern day events is through exacting replicas. Despite not being the original, the level of detail involved makes them valuable in their own right, like this copy of the Brut-sponsed 1978-'79 BSCC Ford Capri. It's so close to the real thing it's even got FIA Historic Technical Papers, allowing it to take part in historic races as if it were the real deal.

For that reason it's not exactly cheap. £61,000 ($78,000) is not Jim Clark's Ford Cortina Lotus money but it's still a serious investment for a proper bit of racing kit.

title

1973 Porsche 911E

Though not a rally-focused machine out of the factory, this 911E was later converted to off-road spec and even entered as a quasi-factory effort by Porsche GB into the 1993 London to Sydney Marathon.

It was a victory contender before getting stuck on a bridge, then breaking down in India, at which point the car was never turned out in anger again. Still showing some of the scars and dents of its swashbuckling adventure, this 911E was oozing character.

Whoever placed the winning bid has bought a whole load of character for £25,000.

title

1968 Alfa Romeo GTAm

And lastly, for something a little different. It's another replica rather than the real thing. But that's probably to its credit. This 1750 GTV transformed into a GTAm replica should be competitive in the right hands in historic racing, with a recent five-figure mechanical overhaul keeping it up to scratch.

Like the Capri replica, it's got the requisite FIA HTP papers to be entered as if it were a real GTAm, allowing whichever owner just parted with £50,000 ($65,000) an opportunity to enter races which otherwise might have been out of reach.

title

Next: Why the McLaren P1 is a living legend

The 903bhp McLaren P1 is now six years old but remains an awe-inspiring machine. Motorious hosted the McLaren halo car at Autosport International 2019. Click here to read more.

Classic Cars for Sale