This is the holy grail for Mopar lovers!

If a burned-up 1970 Plymouth Superbird is worth $59,000, how much is one of these winged warriors worth with just over 21,000 miles on the odometer? We'll find out in less than a month when The Vault starts an online auction for this time capsule Superbird that is in excellent, well-documented condition with amazingly low mileage.

Low-Mileage 1970 Plymouth Superbird Is A Magnificent Mopar

This car has been meticulously maintained, and its history has been inspected and certified by Galen Govier, a Mopar registry owner and VIN/fender tag expert. Painted in Lemon Twist Yellow, this Superbird is all-original with its numbers-matching 440 cubic-inch V8 engine, four-speed manual transmission, rear differential and, of course, the fender tag to back all of this car's build information up. Inside, it has desirable options, such as the vinyl bucket seats, premium trim with charcoal, and black coloring and the pistol-grip shifter. The only thing more impressive than the overall condition and quality of this Superbird is the odometer reading of just 21,186 original miles!

The 1970 Plymouth Superbird was the follow-up sister car to the 1969 Dodge Charger Daytona, but despite the obvious styling similarities, these cars didn't share any body work – including the nose or tail wing. Both of these cars were created to give Chrysler an edge in NASCAR, but the recipe was so successful that rules were implemented for the 1971 season to level the playing field for all makes thus making the winged, aero cars instantly obsolete. Even though the Daytona and Superbird only raced for a single season each, these cars are amongst the most recognizable racecars and classic cars ever produced.

Gallery: Low-Mileage 1970 Plymouth Superbird Is A Magnificent Mopar

The online auction for this 1970 Plymouth Superbird runs from August 28 through September 11, and with prices increasing for these aerodynamic Mopars, there's no telling how high the bids will get on this all-original example. Don't worry, it won't get anywhere close to the $3.5 million bid for Richard Petty's race-driven Superbird.