This 911 Turbo has had the iconic slant-nose conversion along with an impeccable service record

Everyone and their mate knows the story of the 911, and with good reason. A funky engineering experiment that despite all logic and reasoning has somehow stood the test of time with the same recipe, and continues to flourish today as one of the best sports cars money can buy.

The 930, however, has to be the 911 poster car of all the generations. As one of the first cars to use turbocharging technology in a road car it officially established the ‘Widow Maker’ nickname that has stuck with it since.

Anyone who has driven even a relatively slow car from this time period until the noughties will know what a kangaroo like kick an old school turbo can give. Throw in all of the weight hanging onto the rear wheels thanks to the 3.0 liter flat six and you have quite a weapon if put in the wrong hands.

Gallery: 1986 Porsche 930 Turbo

The 3.0 liter unit was a refettled version of the 2.7 RS block that initiated both the rear wing that has become synonymous with spicy 911 variants, as well as the first time ‘Carrera’ was used in the model name. The press were left gaping at the news this turbocharged beast put down 260 horsepower, making it the fastest production car Germany had ever built.

With prices continuing on an upward trajectory, this 930 Turbo is surely the most iconic derivative. With Guards Red paintwork, black leather seats and the instantly recognizable Fuchs alloys it is the poster car we all grew up with.

This particular example, however, is one of the best. With a plethora of trophies already in its cabinet it boasts an impeccable service record, with a huge amount of work having been carried out in the last few years.

1986 Porsche 930 Turbo

1986 was the year Porsche reintroduced the model in the United States, as poor emissions meant the 930 couldn’t pass the rigorous tests. Although Europe had a slightly more powerful version, America received a 278 horsepower version like the one featured here, as opposed to the full fat 296 on offer on its home turf. Still, it was no slouch.

Perhaps the biggest party piece this example offers is the front end. Back in 1990 this 930 went under rather serious surgery to add a slant-nose conversion in lieu of the traditional 911 dual headlight design. The vendor assures the conversion was performed to the highest standards and is a full steel example as opposed to lesser fibreglass conversions.

Add a high quality 1100 watt sound system and factory fitted Brembo brakes and you have the perfect 930 ready to do some serious eighties style damage.